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Fructose Malabsorption: I Am Starving! What Can I Eat?

When beginning a diet for fructose malabsorption you want to eat as simple as possible. Give your body time to heal. A simple and delicious recipe that is very healing and easy to digest is fresh, steamed spinach and white rice. This is something that you will be able to eat every day as long as you keep the portions small. Create a peaceful environment when you eat and never eat more that your belly can handle. Eat slow. Enjoy each bite. Healing the body starts from within. Meditate on love and peace in your life throughout the day. Learn proper breathing techniques and use them. Find time to relax each day.

You may or may not be able to eat the following foods. Not everyone can eat the same things and because there are multiple intolerances that people can have everyone is affected differently by certain foods. This is a guide. Remember to pay attention to your body and write down everything in a food journal or notebook. Space meals and snacks out throughout the day. Portion sizes are crucial. Sometimes ½ of a serving will be tolerated but not one whole serving. Never eat more than one serving unless you know that you can tolerate it. Start small – think fine dining. Also, always check ingredients. Not every product is made the same and often a product will change the ingredients without any warning. You must check labels each time you make a purchase. Many foods and beverages contain HFCS. HFCS is a great big no-no for fructmals. Remember that the FODMAP’s have an accumulative effect in the body. You might be okay with one serving or one food but if they have a chance to gang up on you they will. Keep them in check by knowing your limits and keeping the portions small. You can heal yourself. You are half way there. Give yourself a gold star. You are on your way to a bright, happy, full belly, rich in nutrition and satisfaction.

Meat & Protein

All meat is tolerated as there are no fructose or other fermentable carbohydrates present in meat. Organic meat is a great option because not only is it healthier but tastes much better. Keep your eyes open for added ingredients such as breading, additives, fillers and sauces as they may contain FODMAP’s. Be aware that some processed meats use lactose in the meats. Check with the deli. Fish and seafood are safe as long as there are no intolerable ingredients. Always check ingredients. It is best to prepare meals from scratch because then you know what is in them. Eggs and tofu are suitable protein sources.

Safe grains and starches

There are many safe grains and flours that are suitable for the diet. They are often found in health foods stores or online, especially in the gluten-free sections. White rice is the safest.

  • Rice Bran
  • Gluten-free flour
  • Corn flour
  • Oat bran
  • Quinoa
  • Potato
  • White rice
  • White rice noodles
  • White rice wraps
  • Gluten-free pastas
  • Oats or gluten free oats (Many prefer gluten-free.)

Sweet Treats

Real sugar, otherwise known as sucrose, is okay in small amounts. Be aware of 100% fruit spreads. They often use pear juice to sweeten them. It is best to stay away from these as pears are a big problem for fructmals. Once again, always check labels.

  • Peanut butter (Peanuts can cause difficulty in those sensitive to Candida.)
  • Jam
  • Marmalade
  • Maple syrup
  • Rice syrup
  • Dextrose
  • Smarties and sweettarts made with dextrose (Check labels for smarties and sweettarts. Sometimes they use HFCS.)
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Fruit (fresh)

The quantity of these fruits are very important. Do not eat more than the portion size of a small orange at one time. Space each serving out by at least two to three hours.

  • All Berries; blueberries, boysenberry, cranberry, raspberry, strawberries, etc.
  • Citrus Fruit; oranges, lemon, grapefruit, lime, tangelo, etc.
  • Cantaloupe
  • Durian
  • Paw paw
  • Avacado (very small amount)
  • Passion fruit
  • Ripe Banana
  • Jackfruit
  • Carabola
  • Kiwi
  • Pineapple
  • Rhubarb
  • Guava
  • Grapes
  • Honeydew melon
  • Rhubarb
  • Persimmon
  • Lychee

Vegetables

Once again portion sizes are very important. There are variations among sensitivities in individuals. This is only a guide. Pay attention to your body and use your food journal.

  • Alfalfa
  • Bamboo Shoots
  • Choko
  • Bok Choy
  • Capsicum
  • Carrot
  • Mushrooms
  • Celery (small amount)
  • Zucchini
  • Tomato
  • Choy sum
  • Corn (small amount)
  • Cucumber
  • Endive
  • Zucchini
  • Tomato
  • Potato
  • Eggplant
  • Ginger
  • Sweet potato (small amount)
  • Lettuce, Iceburg
  • Olives
  • Parsnip
  • Pumpkin
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Squash
  • Green beans
  • Turnip

Herbs, Spices and Condiments

  • Thyme
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Rosemary
  • Lemon juice
  • Lime juice
  • Basil
  • Ginger
  • Pepper
  • Golden syrup
  • Pure maple syrup
  • Chives
  • Asafoetida powder
  • Sea salt
  • Coriander
  • Garlic infused oil
  • Parsley

Beverages

  • Tea
  • Coffee (regular and decaffeinated)
  • Herbal teas
  • Hot water with lemon (strongly suggested)

Note: Caffeine can be a gastric irritant. You may want to minimize your caffeine intake if you suspect caffeine contributes to your symptoms.

Wheat and fructan restriction

Wheat-based products are only a problem when wheat is the main ingredient.

When wheat is an ingredient in only small amounts it usually is not a problem unless you are gluten intolerant or have celiac disease.

The diet for fructose malabsorption is low-wheat. You can eat rye, oats, barley and small amounts of wheat or wheat ingredients. Gluten free products are wheat-free so they are suitable for fructose malabsorption, however, you still need to be aware of fructose ingredients such as onion, honey and fruit in these products. There are many wheat ingredients that are safe, as they do not contain large amounts of fructans.

These include:

  • Wheat starch
  • Wheat thickeners
  • Wheat colour caramel
  • Wheat maltodextrin
  • Wheat dextrin
  • Wheat dextrose
  • Wheat glucose
  • Wheat glucose syrup

Lactose

Some people can tolerate low-lactose cheeses. Some low-lactose cheeses include swiss, parmesan, gouda, colby, provolone, cheddar, muenster, and monterey jack. Lactose-free milk and lactose-free cottage cheese are great sources of protein and calcium. Rice milk is another lactose-free alternative. Small servings of yogurt or lactose-free yogurt might be tolerable. Remember to use your food journal. You are an investigator and your intention is to find the healthiest diet for your unique body.

Breakfast Cereal

Remember to check labels. HFCS is a popular ingredient in many processed foods, especially cereals.

  • Oatmeal, Plain (gluten-free if possible but not necessary)
  • Corn flakes
  • Rice Bubbles
  • Rice Puffs
  • Rice flakes

Nuts and seeds (suitable in very small amounts)

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Pine nuts
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almonds
  • Cashews

Wishing you a happy and healthy life of love and prosperity.

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